Lauscha 100 coe testing

This 100 coe glass from Lauscha is mostly used for making glass pens. I was sent some to see if it would be useful to beadmakers too. I received some clear and some striped rods.

The striped rods have a core of clear, then a multi-stripe on two sides that is again thinly encased in clear. So the black and white cane has one stripe in black with a thin border of white and one that is white with a thin border of black.

Lauscha_100coe

One cane is transparent pink with three thin stripes of white on one side and the same with transparent green on the other side.

The last cane is red and goldstone, going black-red-gold-red-black on one side, and the same with white instead on the other.

I made some spacers first.

13.10.19_Lauscha_100coe_spacers_01

The black/white and pink/green work better as spacers, as the red and goldstone one turns out rather muddy because of the black in it. You can see that this is a blue-based black.

13.10.19_Lauscha_100coe_spacers_02

These are rather pretty beads – they do mimic the effect of frit painting, though, and I think they are less striking than the cane because you lose the sharp bands of colour, instead getting a random wispy effect. So they would be an easy way of making large numbers of these same beads, but with frit painting you have as many colours as you have frit.

For a compatibility test, I tried encasing Effetre black with the clear.

13.10.19_Lauscha_100coe_compat

Cracks! This was what I expected to happen, really. The clear also developed quite a few microbubbles – it doesn’t feel as clean as the 104 Lauscha clears. It did melt very easily.

I went on to try with some Plowden & Thompson 100 coe glass that I have.

13.10.19_Lauscha_100coe_P&T_01

This is P&T vanilla with a spiral of the red/goldstone cane and then fully encased in the clear. I added raised leaves or flowers with the cane. No compatibility problems showing up here yet. (I will keep an eye on it for a month or so).

13.10.19_Lauscha_100coe_P&T_02

I think this is quite a pretty bead, but the visibility of the red and goldstone is very much diluted by the amount of clear it has around it. The leaves just have thin bits of colour in them.

If you have other 100 coe opaques, you can do more with this glass, but you are still up against the amount of clear that they have in them.

Finally, I made an off-mandrel squiggle.

13.10.19_lauscha_100coe_squiggle

Now, *this* is a good and different result! It keeps the sharp defined bands that are in the rod, and you can twist it to have them spiralling around. The beads have the problem that they could be made in other ways – you don’t need this cane for those effects. I don’t think the beads look as good as the cane does. I could also have pulled the cane down into twisties, but again I can make my own easily as you don’t need this level of precision in the stripes of a twistie because they even out when they are twisted and pulled down. I think this glass looks best when it is kept looking like the rods, so in sculpture.

My conclusion is that you can definitely use this cane to make pretty beads, but the ways you can use it are limited. It comes into its own if you use it for sculptural work.

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