Posts Tagged striking

CiM colour testing: Indian Summer, Dirty Laundry and a little more Ogre

Indian Summer

Indian Summer is an interesting one – it’s a striking amber.

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I took an on-mandrel pic to show the striking.

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Here are Indian Summer and Dirty Laundry spacers. Indian Summer didn’t etch particularly consistently – the very dark bead appeared to etch more. Dirty Laundry is an opal white, and looks as expected here.

I expected both of these colours to be reactive so had hope for the silver glass results.

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The bead on the right here shows that Indian Summer is not good as a surface encasing colour – it just gets too dark, especially as this bead had a core of Indian Summer as well. The silver glass in that one was Luna 2.1 which is mostly transparent and you can just see some streaks round the middle. The other two beads had a core of 006 clear, encased in Indian Summer, then Luna 2.1 scrolls on the left and Boreas dots in the centre bead. Both promising: the Luna 2.1 scrolls have sharp light edges in some places and fuzzier edges but a defined centre in others – those are the purpler more transparent areas. The Boreas dots have a concentrated very shiny centre, then a ring where it appears the Indian summer has displaced it, then an outer ring which has a shiny area and then a dark sharp outer line.

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I then did a pair which have an Indian Summer core, a spiral of silver glass and encased in 006. Very interesting! Boreas is on the left – the core looks extremely dark and the boreas is a dark blue with bright green edges fading to brown. (Ignore the grey bubbles at the bottom – the end of my clear was dirty and I didn’t notice until too late).

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The Luna 2.1 bead (right) is the usual pinky-purple and has developed blue-green lines and haze in the centre of each spiral. The edges of the spiral are the lighter amber areas.

Dirty Laundry

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Luna 2.1 scrolls on the left, Boreas dots on the right. Both colours get some slight outlining effects, but what is most interesting is the different ways the base has fumed in each case. Under the Boreas, the Dirty Laundry has gone a cold yellow-green, while under the Luna 2.1 it has flushed a warm colour. (Boreas isn’t a great colour to put over pale white or tan opaques because as a transparent purple it will always show brownish).

These next two are fabulous though.

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These are both encased in 006. The silver glass in both cases has a mottled and feathered look with noticeable edges. The Boreas on the right is blue-purple and the Dirty Laundry underneath has fumed a darker caramel brown. The Luna 2.1 bead on the left is lovely. The silver glass has again formed dark then light lines in the centre, and the darker amber lines are the gaps between the spirals. The Dirty Laundry hasn’t fumed very far though, leaving cloudy white ends which I love.

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Here you can see the Dirty Laundry parts of the Boreas bead – they have still fumed somewhat tan and have darker outlines rather than the fuzzy ones with the Luna 2.1.

Ogre

Finally, a silver glass pair on Ogre.

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Luna 2.1 scrolls and Boreas dots, as before. You can see slight separation lines around the edges of the scrolls, and the Boreas dots are again very shiny and have sharp brown rings around them. Around the beadholes has also tended to go brown. Quite interesting for organic beads.

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CiM colour testing: Ogre, Leaf Men

Continuing my writeup of the September batch of new CiM colours, here are a pair of opaque greens: Ogre and Leaf Men.

15.10.07_ogre_leafmen

Ogre was a remake of Tortoise that came out an entirely different shade – I must say, I love it more than Tortoise. The light green and warm brown it develops are a lovely autumnal combo, cleaner than the purple that Tortoise gets.

I took a picture on the mandrel so you can see how the spacers struck. (Making more than three spacers of this size on a mandrel does not work for me – if I do more and let the early ones cool, one or two will crack, no matter how careful I am not to let the flame brush the first ones. So I do the ‘keep all three warm’ method and they survive). On the mandrel with three Ogre beads, the one nearest the end went into the kiln a light grey-blue, which is the colour this looks when not struck at all – it went green in the kiln.

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Ogre gremlin on its own: multiple strikings on areas has given the pinkier brown.

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Ogre and Leaf Men spacers side-by-size. Ogre is lovely and soft etched.

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Leaf Men is streaky as you would expect from green and nicely… leafy. Not bright, not olive.

Leaf Men gremlin:

15.10.07_leafmengremlin_01

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CiM Limited Editions Sept 2013, part 3: striking and silver

To test the striking colours in circumstances where they’re more likely to strike, I made pressed lentil beads.

CiMLtd_reds_absinthe

Radio Flyer: definitely opaque-looking.
Bing: has opacified a bit more. You can see the mandrel hole, but I’d list this as semi-opaque.
Absinthe: still very transparent.
Tandoori: has struck much oranger and has gone cloudy. (Though slightly unevenly at one end, which is lighter than the other). I also did a bead with psyche scrolls on tandoori – the psyche shows up as dark blue with plenty of shine and the tandoori has darkened more.

CiMLtd_tandoori

Here’s a close up of the tandoori beads.

Next I tested mint chip with copper green and psyche.

CiMLtd_mintchip

The mint chip has gone a bit streaky under both of these, but more so with the psyche. The copper green has done its thing where it goes darker in the centre with a pale halo, but it has also greyed up a great deal. Psyche has fumed the base yellow and is showing up as brownish purple. That’s fairly expected.

Here is psyche on the other neutrals.

CiMLtd_neutrals

Cake batter has stayed very clean-looking and has only been fumed a very small amount. The psyche appears very brown.

Antique Lace is a bit streaky, has stayed a pinkish brown and the psyche is fairly brown.

Muskmelon has gone streakier and fumed darker, and the psyche has blue hints. This seems the most reactive base out of the three.

And side-on.

CiMLtd_neutrals_02

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Testing Lauscha reds – new SNT 220 and SNT 219

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Lauscha sent me two new batches of reds to test. We have SNT 220 (07/02/13 batch) and SNT 219 (11/02/13 batch). I also have an older batch of SNT 220 that I included for comparison.

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Here’s a nice labelled picture of them all. You can see that both new batches are fairly similar at a glance, and both are oranger and more transparent than the darker, tending-to-translucent old SNT 220. (I do very much like the old batch – it is similar to CiM maraschino in that it is semi-opaque when used thickly, giving a lovely depth of colour).

I’ll go over each type of bead side-by-side now.

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First we have the spacers. I did not attempt any deliberate striking of these as I wanted to see whether they were auto-striking or needed a little more effort. So I just made four spacers on each mandrel and put them in the kiln. I was surprised how unstruck the SNT 219 ones came out, because they appeared darker when I put them in the kiln.

Verdict: unlike the old SNT 220, they definitely need to be deliberately struck. From the later beads, they don’t seem difficult to strike, but for spacers the attention needs to be paid.

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These two beads were rounded off in a bead roller and have a wrap of Double Helix psyche, heavily reduced. (Excuse the iffy end!) This was the darkest red I got out of either colour. Both base beads are still transparent, though – you can see into them. The difference in outlines round the psyche is may just be due to the way it was melted in, rather than the base – it’s difficult to tell without further testing.

13.02.17_reds_whitedots

These two little beads show how they stand up to being layered. I used Effetre white to make stacked dots. The new SNT 220 came out darker than the SNT 219, which is very orange in the dots. Both had a tendency to unstrike between layers – the SNT 219 was trickier to stay struck at the end.

13.02.17_reds_roses

Finally, I made a pair of sculptural roses to see how they behaved when repeatedly heated and cooled, since these go in and out of the flame repeatedly as I add each petal. Both roses remained mostly transparent – the SNT 220 has a little cloudiness whereas the SNT 219 is almost perfectly transparent. The SNT 219 has stayed a little less struck in the centre and at the outer edges of some petals, which is a lovely effect in this kind of bead. Both are still orange-tinted reds.

Both of these are very nice reds. There was no tendency to go brown in either of them. I’d probably pick one rather than both as they’re quite similar, it’s just tricky to choose which one! The 219 is lovely as a rose while the 220 is better in dots and probably marginally easier to strike.

For further testing, I plan to make the same beads with my old SNT 220, and to make a plain lentil bead in all three of the reds. I may make a heart in the two new reds too.

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